Review of the hyogo framework for

While some progress in building resilience and reducing losses and damages has been achieved, a substantial reduction of disaster risk requires perseverance and persistence, with a more explicit focus on people and their health and livelihoods, and regular follow-up.

Developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, small island developing States, landlocked developing countries and African countries, as well as middle-income countries facing specific challenges, need special attention and support to augment domestic resources and capabilities through bilateral and multilateral channels in order to ensure adequate, sustainable, and timely means of implementation in capacity-building, financial and technical assistance and technology transfer, in accordance with international commitments.

In their approach to disaster risk reduction, States, regional and international organizations and other relevant stakeholders should take into consideration the key activities listed under each of these four priorities and should implement them, as appropriate, taking into consideration respective capacities and capabilities, in line with national laws and regulations.

Hyogo framework for action

It states that standards can be developed for the implementation of DRR at regional and national levels, but emphasizes the need for the international community to support governments in the implementation of the HFA in a more coherent and integrated fashion. Having completed the assessment and review of and considered the experience gained under its implementation, we hereby adopt the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction — In addition, between and , million people were displaced by disasters. The Conference also reaffirmed all the principles of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development. International cooperation for disaster risk reduction includes a variety of sources and is a critical element in supporting the efforts of developing countries to reduce disaster risk. Their commitment, goodwill, knowledge, experience and resources will be required. It is necessary for such mechanisms to have a strong foundation in national institutional frameworks with clearly assigned responsibilities and authority to, inter alia, identify sectoral and multisectoral disaster risk, build awareness and knowledge of disaster risk through sharing and dissemination of non-sensitive disaster risk information and data, contribute to and coordinate reports on local and national disaster risk, coordinate public awareness campaigns on disaster risk, facilitate and support local multisectoral cooperation e.

It highlights the significant progress that has been made over the past five years in disaster risk reduction and the fact that the adoption of the Hyogo Framework for Action in has played a decisive role in promoting this progress across international, regional, and national agendas.

Overall, the Hyogo Framework for Action has provided critical guidance in efforts to reduce disaster risk and has contributed to the progress towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

United Nations. National and local levels Having completed the assessment and review of and considered the experience gained under its implementation, we hereby adopt the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction — In addition, between andmillion people were displaced by disasters.

sendai framework vs hyogo framework

International mechanisms for strategic advice, coordination and partnership development for disaster risk reduction, such as the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction and the regional platforms for disaster risk reduction, as well as other relevant international and regional forums for cooperation, have been instrumental in the development of policies and strategies and the advancement of knowledge and mutual learning.

Priority 2: Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk.

Difference between sendai framework and hyogo framework upsc

While some progress in building resilience and reducing losses and damages has been achieved, a substantial reduction of disaster risk requires perseverance and persistence, with a more explicit focus on people and their health and livelihoods, and regular follow-up. These targets will be measured at the global level and will be complemented by work to develop appropriate indicators. It is urgent and critical to anticipate, plan for and reduce disaster risk in order to more effectively protect persons, communities and countries, their livelihoods, health, cultural heritage, socioeconomic assets and ecosystems, and thus strengthen their resilience. United Nations. During the World Conference, States also reiterated their commitment to address disaster risk reduction and the building of resilience to disasters with a renewed sense of urgency within the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication, and to integrate, as appropriate, both disaster risk reduction and the building of resilience into policies, plans, programmes and budgets at all levels and to consider both within relevant frameworks. The steady growth of disaster risk, including the increase of people and assets exposure, combined with the lessons learned from past disasters, indicates the need to further strengthen disaster preparedness for response, take action in anticipation of events, integrate disaster risk reduction in response preparedness and ensure that capacities are in place for effective response and recovery at all levels. Ensuring credible links, as appropriate, between these processes will contribute to building resilience and achieving the global goal of eradicating poverty. Specifically, the Review highlights the need to integrate climate change adaptation and DRR at the national and local levels through integrated plans to enhance resilience of communities. Such measures are cost-effective and instrumental to save lives, prevent and reduce losses and ensure effective recovery and rehabilitation. Developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, small island developing States, landlocked developing countries and African countries, as well as middle-income countries facing specific challenges, need special attention and support to augment domestic resources and capabilities through bilateral and multilateral channels in order to ensure adequate, sustainable, and timely means of implementation in capacity-building, financial and technical assistance and technology transfer, in accordance with international commitments. The Conference invites the General Assembly, at its seventieth session, to consider the possibility of including the review of the global progress in the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction — as part of its integrated and coordinated follow-up processes to United Nations conferences and summits, aligned with the Economic and Social Council, the High-level Political Forum for Sustainable Development and the quadrennial comprehensive policy review cycles, as appropriate, taking into account the contributions of the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction and regional platforms for disaster risk reduction and the Hyogo Framework for Action Monitor system. Enhanced work to reduce exposure and vulnerability, thus preventing the creation of new disaster risks, and accountability for disaster risk creation are needed at all levels. Addressing climate change as one of the drivers of disaster risk, while respecting the mandate of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, represents an opportunity to reduce disaster risk in a meaningful and coherent manner throughout the interrelated intergovernmental processes. A gender, age, disability and cultural perspective should be integrated in all policies and practices, and women and youth leadership should be promoted.

It aims to guide the multi-hazard management of disaster risk in development at all levels as well as within and across all sectors.

Rated 9/10 based on 36 review
Download
Hyogo Framework for Action